Tag Archives: military medical research

Dietary Substances in the Military: The Metabolically Optimized Brain

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More members of the U.S. military (74%) use dietary substances than civilians (52%)1; however the safety and value of these substances are largely unknown within the military community.

Samueli Institute was commissioned to develop “The Program for Research on Dietary Supplements in Military Operations and Healthcare: The Metabolically Optimized Brain (MOB) Study” in 2013 to uncover nutrition’s role in Service members’ mission readiness. Continue reading “Dietary Substances in the Military: The Metabolically Optimized Brain” »

On Human Flourishing: An interview with Dr. Scott Shreve

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Dr. Scott Shreve, Director of Hospice and Palliative Care at the Department of Veterans Affairs, joins Dr. Jonas for a conversation on the growing need for end-of-life care for veterans.

“Roughly a little over 600,000 veterans died this past year, and not all of them are enrolled in the V.A.,” said Dr. Shreve. “Three percent of veterans die in V.A. facilities. So where are 97 percent of our veteran population dying? And that’s one in four Americans, but if you happen to look at just men, it’s probably one in two of all the deaths in America. So we realized, strategically, about four years ago, we needed to partner with the community, and went to the national Hospice Palliative Care organization, and established this program called We Honor Veterans, where you engage community hospices and empower them about veteran issues.”

This episode marks the end of season one of On Human Flourishing. We will return with new episodes in September. Thanks for listening.

The Facts and the Future of CAM in the Military

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Maintaining peak performance, reducing stress and recovering from trauma are essential for military personnel. More and more service members are turning to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and integrative medicine (IM) to meet their needs—often at higher rates than the civilian population.

Continue reading “The Facts and the Future of CAM in the Military” »

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